no forced labour, no modern slavery and no human trafficking, and no child labour

CUD rejects human trafficking, forced labor and any violence or forced labor on children, in this sense the University developed an Anti-slavery and Human Trafficking Policy which aims to protect children from any type of violence or forced labor. CUD carries out activities with children for their well-being, health and knowledge.

Modern slavery is a crime and a violation of fundamental human rights. It takes various forms, such as slavery, servitude, forced and compulsory labour and human trafficking, all of which have in common the deprivation of a person’s liberty by another in order to exploit them for personal or commercial gain. We are committed to acting ethically and with integrity in all our business dealings and relationships and to implementing and enforcing effective systems and controls to ensure modern slavery is not taking place anywhere in our own business or in any of our supply chains.

CUD are also committed to ensuring there is transparency in our own business and in our approach to tackling modern slavery throughout our supply chains, consistent with our disclosure obligations under the Modern Slavery Act 2015. We expect the same high standards from all of our contractors, suppliers and other business partners, and as part of our contracting processes, we include specific prohibitions against the use of forced, compulsory or trafficked labour, or anyone held in slavery or servitude, whether adults or children, and we expect that our suppliers will hold their own suppliers to the same high standards.

This policy applies to all persons working for us or on our behalf in any capacity, including employees at all levels, directors, officers, agency workers, seconded workers, volunteers, interns, agents, contractors, external consultants, third-party representatives and business partners.

This policy does not form part of any employee’s contract of employment and we may amend it at any time.

CUD Anti-slavery and Human Trafficking Policy - Responsibility for the policy

The University Council has overall responsibility for ensuring this policy complies with our legal and ethical obligations, and that all those under our control comply with it.

The Chief Financial Officer has primary and day-to-day responsibility for implementing this policy, monitoring its use and effectiveness, dealing with any queries about it, and auditing internal control systems and procedures to ensure they are effective in countering modern slavery.

Management at all levels are responsible for ensuring those reporting to them understand and comply with this policy and are given adequate and regular training on it and the issue of modern slavery in supply chains.

CUD Anti-slavery and Human Trafficking Policy - Compliance

You must ensure that you read, understand and comply with this policy.

The prevention, detection and reporting of modern slavery in any part of our business or supply chains is the responsibility of all those working for us or under our control. You are required to avoid any activity that might lead to, or suggest, a breach of this policy.

You must notify your manager as soon as possible if you believe or suspect that a conflict with this policy has occurred, or may occur in the future.

You are encouraged to raise concerns about any issue or suspicion of modern slavery in any parts of our business or supply chains of any supplier tier at the earliest possible stage.

If you believe or suspect a breach of this policy has occurred or that it may occur, you must notify your manager or report it in accordance with our Public Interest Disclosure Policy as soon as possible.

If you are unsure about whether a particular act, the treatment of workers more generally, or their working conditions within any tier of our supply chains constitutes any of the various forms of modern slavery, raise it with your manager.

We aim to encourage openness and will support anyone who raises genuine concerns in good faith under this policy, even if they turn out to be mistaken. We are committed to ensuring no one suffers any detrimental treatment as a result of reporting in good faith their suspicion that modern slavery of whatever form is or may be taking place in any part of our own business or in any of our supply chains. Detrimental treatment includes dismissal, disciplinary action, threats or other unfavorable treatment connected with raising a concern. If you believe that you have suffered any such treatment, you should inform your manager immediately. If the matter is not remedied, and you are an employee, you should raise it formally following our Grievance Policy and Procedure.

CUD Anti-slavery and Human Trafficking Policy - Communication and awareness of this policy

Training on this policy, and on the risk our business faces from modern slavery in its supply chains, forms part of the induction process for all individuals who work for us, and regular training will be provided as necessary.

Our commitment to addressing the issue of modern slavery in our business and supply chains must be communicated to all suppliers, contractors and business partners at the outset of our business relationship with them and reinforced as appropriate thereafter.

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The newly launch Potential Adaptive Child Education (PACE) Centre has quickly established itself as an alternative to traditional Special Education Needs (SEN) provision as it sets out to celebrate and nurture the unique talents of every student in its care. The Centre, located in Umm Suqeim, is part of the Dubai Education portfolio that also includes Canadian University Dubai (CUD). Set in a colorfully engaging physical environment, students are challenged to learn to comfortably transition between academic classes and their special classes, which might include art, music, play therapy, computer science, and physical education, so that staff can tap into and nurture their individual skills and abilities.

Director Dr. Jaclyn Fowler reveals, “Our mission is to serve young people with special needs by creating opportunities for all our students to live their fullest, most joyous lives. We do this by operating within systems approach where, for example, therapy and learning are combined in a seamless whole, not in isolation one from the other, so that therapy and learning inform and enhance one another.” The Centre bring together teachers, therapists, learning support professionals, parents, and the wider community to play a collective role in creating a program that provides safe and outward-looking circles of care and life opportunities for students.

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In collaboration with Friends of Cancer Patients (FoCP) moral support program, Canadian University Dubai (CUD) visited children with cancer and other diseases to help improve their lives. Taking place at the Dubai Hospital, the activity was intended to spread happiness and positivity among the hospital’s young patients.

A main part of the visit was a live professional balloon twister presented by the UAE entertainment organization ‘Kiducation Parties’, with their imaginative creation of animals, hats, and cartoon characters; bringing smiles and laughter to children’s faces and to the faces of their parents. The uplifting performance was followed by a stack of different presents where children had the choice of choosing one or more toys to keep. The entire visit was full of smiles and laughter, interacting with every child to ensure they are entertained and happy.

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A team of students from Canadian University Dubai (CUD) is working to unite the deaf and non-deaf communities in the UAE through the creation of an innovative mobile application, as part of an initiative to promote social responsibility. The app, known as Efhamni – ‘understand me’ in English – aims to help deaf people of all ages to communicate, by teaching them the fundamentals of Emirati sign language. The project was conceived in response to research by the team, which found that families with deaf children tend to adopt more informal methods of communication that might limit the child’s potential to engage with wider society.

The team plans to create a simple interface with seven symbols representing basic topics including food, clothing, sport and places, each with a selection of video tutorials for sign-language that relates to the theme. Team member Hira Abdul Bari explained, “Our ultimate aim is to spread awareness of sign-language by creating a simple app that helps deaf people communicate about the routines of everyday life. We have collaborated with sign-language professionals to help ensure that the app will make a real difference and hopefully contribute to a better future for members of the deaf community”.

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UAE is committed to ending forced labor in all its forms, in this regard efforts have been made to care for and protect victims, as well as take measures to prevent human trafficking.

The UAE is a leading player in the global campaign against human trafficking. The UAE was the first country in the region to enact a comprehensive anti-human trafficking law with Federal Law 51 in 2006. Under the law, human trafficking includes all forms of sexual exploitation and engaging others in prostitution, servitude, forced labor, organ trafficking, coerced service, enslavement, begging, and quasi-slavery practices. In addition, the law ensures that a person aware of an incident of human trafficking and does not report it can be punished. The law raises awareness of crimes linked to human trafficking and provides support and protection to victims and eyewitnesses. It stipulates a minimum fine of AED 100,000 and a minimum term of five years in prison for offenders. In 2013, the law was amended in conformity with the United Nations Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol), which the UAE ratified in 2009. The law was further amended in February 2015 to strengthen support and protection for victims and witnesses.

The National Committee to Combat Human Trafficking (NCCHT) was established by Cabinet decision in 2007 in order to coordinate efforts to ensure effective enforcement of Federal Law 51. The Committee includes 18 representatives from various federal and local institutions. NCCHT has implemented a five-point strategy to fight the menace of trafficking, comprised of prevention, prosecution, punishment, protection and the promotion of international cooperation. NCCHT produces an annual report on combating human trafficking in the UAE, which can be found on the Committee's website: www.nccht.gov.ae

The UAE currently maintains a network of shelters to protect and rehabilitate victims of human trafficking. Shelters are located in Abu Dhabi (EWAA Shelter for Women and Children), Dubai (Dubai Foundation for Women and Children), and Ras Al Khaimah (Aman Shelter for Women and Children). A dedicated hotline facilitates the reporting of cases of human trafficking and enables victims to request protection by calling 800SAVE.

Since human trafficking most often begins in the home countries of victims, the UAE has signed agreements with several countries to exchange best practices on the prevention of human trafficking and enhance assistance for victims of this crime. The UAE also participates in several regional and international efforts to counter human trafficking and regularly raises the issue at fora such as the Arab Human Rights Commission Charter Committee.

In previous years, the UAE has hosted the UN Special Rapporteur on Trafficking in Persons, who recognized the progress achieved by the national campaign to combat human trafficking.

The UAE condemns, prohibits and penalizes human trafficking through a comprehensive action plan to fight it regionally and abroad. The plan includes: prevention of human trafficking, prosecution and punishment of traffickers, protection of survivors and promotion of international cooperation.

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UAE Government established the Ewa'a Shelters for women and children victims of human trafficking and sexual exploitation.

In Abu Dhabi, ‘Abu Dhabi Shelter and Humanitarian Care Centre’ (Ewa’a), an affiliate of the Department of Community Development, is responsible for providing care, safe shelter and health and psychological care to victims of human trafficking and all forms of violence including domestic violence. The centre’s responsibilities include developing awareness programmes to prevent human trafficking and all types of abuse in coordination with relevant entities.

In Dubai, Dubai Foundation for Women and Children (DFWAC) is the first licensed non-profit shelter for women and children who are victims of domestic violence, abuse and human trafficking in the UAE. It was established in July 2007 to offer victims immediate protection and support services in accordance with international human rights obligations.

The foundation provides free services to women and children who are victims of violence. It offers a helpline, safe shelter, case management, medical care, psychological support, counselling and legal, consular and immigration assistance. In addition to those core services, DFWAC also provides secondary support services including children's education, recreational activities, vocational services, physical fitness, all-round empowerment and skills training.

In Sharjah, Women's Protection Centre of the Social Services Department of Government of Sharjah (SSSD) has allocated a toll free number 800-800-700 to provide social, psychological and legal counselling and solutions to domestic issues by legal, social and psychological specialists. SSSD also provides family consultations through its website.

In addition, there are several social support centers under the supervision of Abu Dhabi Police that look after victims of human trafficking. They render all necessary support in co-ordination and co-operation with various relevant institutions.

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Employment of Juveniles under the age 15 is banned in UAE. However, effective January 2011, teenagers in the age group 15-18 years are allowed to work, on obtaining a teenage work permit from the Labour Ministry. However, there are certain restrictions on the type of work and hours of employment.

According to a new decree issued in 2016 by the HR Ministry, students are allowed to complete training periods and fill in positions in the private sector after obtaining work permits. According to the decree, guardians of students aged 12 to 18 years should produce a written consent for training purposes, while those aged 15 to 18 years should seek work permit. The decree grants national and foreign students similar conditions in terms of benefits and advantages to those already filling the same spot.

The authorized temporary work permit allows facilities to hire national or expat students registered or non-registered in the Ministry’s database, including students to work on projects with completion periods not exceeding six months, with Dh.500 as permit fee. The Ministry grants temporary work permit for facilities to use nationals or non-nationals registered in the ministry database, including students to work for lesser hours in the same jobs as those filled by their counterparts for a period of maximum one year, with a fee of Dh.500.

Juvenile work permits are offered to employ nationals or non-nationals in the 15 to 18 age bracket, thereby enabling them to work for a period of not more than a year, with Dh.500 as fee. The Ministry has however, warned against making the appointed students work for more than six hours a day. They should be granted more than an hour of rest, breaks to eat or pray, and should consider not to keep them on duty for more than four consecutive hours a day.

The permits can be availed from Tasheel Service Centre through ministry’s smart phone applications.

Employers, before employing a juvenile, should retain copies of certain documents in the juvenile’s personal file, such as birth certificate, physical fitness certificate issued by a specialized physician, written consent from juvenile’s guardian, etc. Further, the employment of a juvenile is prohibited when the job requires night shifts, or involves hazardous jobs or is harmful to health, such as underground jobs in mines, quarries, furnaces of melting metals, oil refining, asphalt industry and bakeries. Further, when working hours exceed six hours a day, one or more breaks should be provided. Juveniles are not permitted to work overtime, or on holidays. A Juvenile work permit has a validity period of one year.

Employment of women at night between 10:00pm and 7:00am is prohibited, except under certain situations such as during work stoppages due to force majeure, employees in technical and administrative position, or other jobs as determined by the Labour Ministry, wherein the woman employee is not required to perform a manual job. Women are also not to be employed in difficult tasks and other duties harmful to health or morals.

The UAE is a leading player in the global campaign against human trafficking. The UAE was the first country in the region to enact a comprehensive anti-human trafficking law with Federal Law 51 in 2006. Under the law, human trafficking includes all forms of sexual exploitation and engaging others in prostitution, servitude, forced labor, organ trafficking, coerced service, enslavement, begging, and quasi-slavery practices. In addition, the law ensures that a person aware of an incident of human trafficking and does not report it can be punished. The law raises awareness of crimes linked to human trafficking and provides support and protection to victims and eyewitnesses.

It stipulates a minimum fine of AED 100,000 and a minimum term of five years in prison for offenders. In 2013, the law was amended in conformity with the United Nations Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol), which the UAE ratified in 2009. The law was further amended in February 2015 to strengthen support and protection for victims and witnesses.

The National Committee to Combat Human Trafficking (NCCHT) was established by Cabinet decision in 2007 in order to coordinate efforts to ensure effective enforcement of Federal Law 51. The Committee includes 18 representatives from various federal and local institutions. NCCHT has implemented a five-point strategy to fight the menace of trafficking, comprised of prevention, prosecution, punishment, protection and the promotion of international cooperation. NCCHT produces an annual report on combating human trafficking in the UAE, which can be found on the Committee's website: www.nccht.gov.ae

The UAE currently maintains a network of shelters to protect and rehabilitate victims of human trafficking. Shelters are located in Abu Dhabi (EWAA Shelter for Women and Children), Dubai (Dubai Foundation for Women and Children), and Ras Al Khaimah (Aman Shelter for Women and Children). A dedicated hotline facilitates the reporting of cases of human trafficking and enables victims to request protection by calling 800SAVE.

Since human trafficking most often begins in the home countries of victims, the UAE has signed agreements with several countries to exchange best practices on the prevention of human trafficking and enhance assistance for victims of this crime. The UAE also participates in several regional and international efforts to counter human trafficking and regularly raises the issue at fora such as the Arab Human Rights Commission Charter Committee.

In previous years, the UAE has hosted the UN Special Rapporteur on Trafficking in Persons, who recognized the progress achieved by the national campaign to combat human trafficking.

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The UAE condemns, prohibits and penalizes human trafficking through a comprehensive action plan to fight it regionally and abroad. The plan includes: prevention of human trafficking, prosecution and punishment of traffickers, protection of survivors and promotion of international cooperation.

Report human trafficking and get support

UAE Government established the Ewa'a Shelters for women and children victims of human trafficking and sexual exploitation.

In Abu Dhabi, ‘Abu Dhabi Shelter and Humanitarian Care Centre’ (Ewa’a), an affiliate of the Department of Community Development, is responsible for providing care, safe shelter and health and psychological care to victims of human trafficking and all forms of violence including domestic violence. The centre’s responsibilities include developing awareness programmes to prevent human trafficking and all types of abuse in coordination with relevant entities.

In Dubai, Dubai Foundation for Women and Children (DFWAC) is the first licensed non-profit shelter for women and children who are victims of domestic violence, abuse and human trafficking in the UAE. It was established in July 2007 to offer victims immediate protection and support services in accordance with international human rights obligations.

The foundation provides free services to women and children who are victims of violence. It offers a helpline, safe shelter, case management, medical care, psychological support, counselling and legal, consular and immigration assistance. In addition to those core services, DFWAC also provides secondary support services including children's education, recreational activities, vocational services, physical fitness, all-round empowerment and skills training.

In Sharjah, Women's Protection Centre of the Social Services Department of Government of Sharjah (SSSD) has allocated a toll free number 800-800-700 to provide social, psychological and legal counselling and solutions to domestic issues by legal, social and psychological specialists. SSSD also provides family consultations through its website.

In addition, there are several social support centres under the supervision of Abu Dhabi Police that look after victims of human trafficking. They render all necessary support in co-ordination and co-operation with various relevant institutions.

There is also the General Directorate for Human Rights Protection that works under the supervision of Dubai Police and provides psychological, social and legal support to women and children who are victims of human trafficking. The Directorate provides victims with support such as temporary shelter, temporary visas and air tickets to return to their homelands.

Report human trafficking issues through Dubai Police-Control Center of Human Trafficking on +9714-6082347

Hotline for labour complaints: 8005005

Hotline for human trafficking issues: 8007283

Fax: +971 4 217 1644

Email: htccc@dubaipolice.gov.ae.

Laws against human trafficking

The UAE as a committed and responsible member of the international community has been proactive in the global fight to combat human trafficking.

Federal Law No. 51 of 2006 as amended by Federal law No.1 of 2015 was the start of the UAE's official initiatives to combat human trafficking locally and to enhance the UAE's role in the international efforts aimed at eliminating human trafficking crimes.

Under the law, human trafficking includes all forms of sexual exploitation, engaging others in prostitution, servitude, forced labour, organ-trafficking, coerced service, enslavement, begging and quasi-slavery practices. In addition, the law ensures that a person aware of a human trafficking crime and does not report it can be punished.

The law raises awareness of the crime, helps the victims, as well as protects victims and any eyewitnesses. It stipulates a minimum fine of AED 100,000 and a minimum of five years in jail for offenders.

Other laws that address human trafficking in the UAE are:

    • Federal Law No. 15 of 1993 which deals with organ transplant

    • The regulation on Federal Law No. 18 of 2009 which modified the process of registering births and deaths.

Fighting human trafficking

The National Committee for Combatting Human Trafficking (NCCHT) was established in 2007 pursuant to a Cabinet order to coordinate efforts and enforce plans to combat human trafficking at various levels in all the seven emirates of the federation. The Committee includes 18 representatives from various federal and local institutions.

Since its establishment, the Committee has sought to achieve its aims through many initiatives and activities including the staging of specialized meetings, visits and workshops. Today, it is seen as the UAE's official representative at international conferences relating to combating human trafficking.

Ministry of Interior initiated several mechanisms to protect human rights, particularly all forms of human trafficking. Some of its initiatives are:

  • Promoting anti-human trafficking culture and awareness

  • Cooperating with Interpol through exchange of information on human trafficking crimes

  • Monitoring individuals involved or suspected of being involved in such crimes

  • Enforcing tighter control at entry points

  • Using unified criminal justice and Interpol systems to verify individuals at entry points.

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UAE laws prohibit the employment of children under the age of 15, while those aged 15 to 18 are allowed to work on certain terms related to working hours and conditions. students between the ages of 15 and 18 are allowed to work and issued with a temporary work permit. as for training, students between the ages of 15 and 18 receive a training permit from the ministry of human resources and settlement.

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The uae federal labor code prohibits the employment of juveniles of both sexes before the age of 15, and the ministry of human resources and settlement does not grant work permits to any emirati juvenile or resident expatriate under the age of 15.

On the other hand, the law allows juveniles between the ages of 15 and 18 to work under official work permits issued by the ministry, provided that the employer wishing to employ the young juvenile meets certain conditions, including:

      • written consent of the juvenile's guardian, or who has jurisdiction or guardianship over him

      • birth certificate, or certificate of juvenile age assessment issued by the relevant medical authorities

      • a certificate of health fitness for the required work issued by the relevant medical authorities

      • if the event is not a citizen, the resident expat event and its selves must have a valid residence, which is fixed to their passport.

      • the work to be operated shall not be among the prohibited actions under the ministerial decisions present, or decisions made in this regard.

      • the license of the establishment/employer must be valid

      • payment of required fees

Additional conditions

In accordance with the law, juveniles may not be operated at night in industrial projects, or do hazardous or harmful work.

The maximum actual working hours for juveniles are six hours per day, and working hours must be interspersed with one or more rest periods.

for more information on the subject, see links from the ministry of human resources and settlement website:

    • Labour Law - Read Title II (Employment of Workers, Employmentof Juveniles and Women(PDF, 347KB)

    • Read under the topic of decisions and circulars: permit section and work card:

      1. Ministerial decision no. (1188) for 2010 on the controls and conditions for granting internal work permits

      2. Ministerial decision no. (1189) for 2010 on the controls and conditions for granting work permits to juveniles

The UAE has signed several international conventions on children's rights:

      • Convention on the rights of the child (1997)

      • Nine ilo conventions, including topics on working hours, forced labour, labour inspections, women's night work, equal pay, minimum working age and the worst forms of child labour

      • Convention against transnational organized crime and its protocol to prevent, suppress and punish trafficking in persons, particularly women and children (palermo protocol)

      • Arab charter of human rights (2008).

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