3.3.2 Does your university as a body deliver outreach programmes and projects in the local community (which can include student volunteering programmes) to improve or promote health & wellbeing including hygiene, nutrition, family planning, sports, exercise, aging well, and other health and wellbeing related topics?

Dubai, United Arab Emirates: In collaboration with Friends of Cancer Patients (FoCP) moral support program, Canadian University Dubai (CUD) visited children with cancer and other diseases to help improve their lives. Taking place at the Dubai Hospital, the activity was intended to spread happiness and positivity among the hospital’s young patients.

A main part of the visit was a live professional balloon twister presented by the UAE entertainment organization ‘Kiducation Parties’, with their imaginative creation of animals, hats, and cartoon characters; bringing smiles and laughter to children’s faces and to the faces of their parents. The uplifting performance was followed by a stack of different presents where children had the choice of choosing one or more toys to keep.

The entire visit was full of smiles and laughter, interacting with every child to ensure they are entertained and happy.

Students, faculty and staff members of Canadian University Dubai (CUD) have come together to help save lives at the annual blood drive held on campus.

More than 70 donors came along to give blood in support of the campaign led by the Dubai Health Authority Blood Donation Centre at Latifa Hospital.

The donations will be used for patients suffering from the blood disorder Thalassemia, a condition that results in the abnormal formation of hemoglobin. Sufferers of the inherited illness need blood every three to four weeks to stabilize their condition. The blood will also be used in cancer treatment, heart surgery and cases of blood loss.

The CUD blood drive is organized by the University Health Centre in collaboration with Student Affairs as part of an annual program of health action and awareness raising activities that takes place on campus.

Ms. Kim Karema, the University Nurse said, "The blood donation drive is an important event in our calendar as it's an opportunity for the University to show its support for the local community. Giving blood is a simple process and one unit can save up to three lives."

Dubai, United Arab Emirates: CUD Family has come together to help saves lives at the annual blood drive held on campus.

More than 50 donors came forward to give blood in support of the University’s 'Wellness Month' Campaign in partnership with the Dubai Health Authority Blood Donation Centre at Latifa Hospital.

The donations will be used for patients suffering from any kind of blood disorder or in need of transfusions as a result difficult illnesses such as leukemia, heart surgery, thalassemia, cancer treatment, and for cases of blood loss.

The CUD blood drive is organized by the University Health Centre in collaboration with Student Affairs as part of an annual wellness campaign to raise health awareness through activities that take place on campus.

"The blood donation drive is a very important event as it is an opportunity for the University to show its support to the local community and make a difference! Each donation can save 3 – 4 patients. Giving blood is a simple process and you will give the gift to life” said Ms. Kim Karema, the University Nurse."

Senior students from the School of Public Health & Health Sciences at Canadian University Dubai (CUD) have been given a revealing insight into the practices employed to reduce the risk of food-borne illnesses during a recent field visit to Dubai World Trade Centre.

Coordinated by Associate Professors, Dr. Rami El Khatib, in collaboration with instructors from Dubai Municipality, the practicum was organized to give students firsthand experience of Hazard Analysis of Critical Points (HACCP) practices, which monitor food from the time of harvest to the time of consumption.

Led by Mr. Ravi Arul, Manager of Hygiene and Safety at Dubai World Trade Centre, the students met with the event and hospitality services crew and were taken through a tour of the stores, chillers, freezers and kitchens. They then had the opportunity to monitor and evaluate HACCP application using the seven principles of the system, applied within the World Trade Centre hospitality service department.

Speaking about the experience, student, Shanice Da Costa, said, “We were taken through each step of how the food in the kitchens are received, stored, processed, cooked and monitored. The journey was informative, but moreover, it made us realize that handling a kitchen that caters to more than 5,000 people per day is a challenge.

“The most interesting object we came across at the kitchen was an enormous machine that they called the 'boilers'. The cooks placed multiple ingredients into the boiler, set a recipe on a digital display that controlled the machine, and the machine would whip up a dish for 500 plates. All in all, it was a wonderful experience, and one that was unique to our program, letting us see the fun and work that goes into preparing one meal at such a big place.”




April 3rd, 2017: A group of students from the School of Public Health & Health Sciences at Canadian University Dubai has taken part in a Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) training session to mark 2017 MENA Heart Saver Month.

Under the supervision of Assistant Professor, Dr. Yassen Alfoteih, and Associate Professor, Dr. Rami El Khatib, the students attended the program hosted by the Critical Care Committee of Latifa Women and Children’s Hospital, which was organized to coincide with CPR awareness day.

This aim of the workshop was to train non-medical members of the local community to enable them to recognize emergencies and to provide a first response to victims in need. The students were taught and practiced simple steps of CPR and learnt more about how these ‘Know and Start’ CPR actions could help to double or triple the survival rates of the victims if applied early in an emergency situation.

MENA Heart Saver Month is an annual campaign that aims to promote heart health and raise awareness of heart-related illnesses and first aid. Reflecting on the training, third year Environmental Health Management student, Crizelle Vaz said, “This was a very interesting and practical session that provided us with important revival skills and I’m pleased that I now feel able to respond in an emergency.”

February 13th, 2017: Senior students from the School of Public Health & Health Sciences at Canadian University Dubai (CUD) have been given a revealing insight into the practices employed to reduce the risk of food-borne illnesses during a recent field visit to Dubai World Trade Centre.

Coordinated by Associate Professors, Dr. Rami El Khatib, in collaboration with instructors from Dubai Municipality, the practicum was organized to give students firsthand experience of Hazard Analysis of Critical Points (HACCP) practices, which monitor food from the time of harvest to the time of consumption.

Led by Mr. Ravi Arul, Manager of Hygiene and Safety at Dubai World Trade Centre, the students met with the event and hospitality services crew and were taken through a tour of the stores, chillers, freezers and kitchens. They then had the opportunity to monitor and evaluate HACCP application using the seven principles of the system, applied within the World Trade Centre hospitality service department.

Speaking about the experience, student, Shanice Da Costa, said, “We were taken through each step of how the food in the kitchens are received, stored, processed, cooked and monitored. The journey was informative, but moreover, it made us realize that handling a kitchen that caters to more than 5,000 people per day is a challenge.

“The most interesting object we came across at the kitchen was an enormous machine that they called the 'boilers'. The cooks placed multiple ingredients into the boiler, set a recipe on a digital display that controlled the machine, and the machine would whip up a dish for 500 plates. All in all, it was a wonderful experience, and one that was unique to our program, letting us see the fun and work that goes into preparing one meal at such a big place.”


Haya Merai, a graduate of the Bachelor of Health Organization Management program at Canadian University Dubai (CUD) has returned to the University to promote skin cancer awareness as part of a campaign by her now employer, Friends of Cancer Patients.

Haya, who is a Junior Project Executive with the Sharjah-based charity, brought the ‘Mole Talk’ campaign to the CUD campus, to help create awareness about the importance of prevention and early detection of skin cancer among young people in the UAE.

Speaking about the campaign, Haya said, “At the moment there doesn’t seem to be a widespread awareness in the UAE about the risk factors associated with skin cancer, despite the country’s climate, so our aim is to work with organizations such as CUD to deliver information about the importance of being sun-safe and looking for early symptoms.”

The Friends of Cancer Patients campaign is based on the ABCDE guide to detecting changes in the characteristics of moles. Organized by the Student Affair’s Health Centre team, the campaign also brought a doctor and nurse on campus to allow students and university personnel to be examined by specialist medical practitioners.

Haya, who also undertook her internship with Friends of Cancer Patients while studying at CUD, will be returning to the University campus later in the year for the breast cancer awareness and shanab campaigns, which will involve a series of fundraising events organized by Student Services.

Under the subject, “Protect our Species,” CUD’s H3 Club organised the annual Earth Day on campus.

The aim of the event was to raise awareness & educate students about the importance of the Reduce, Re-use and Re-cycle initiative and addressed issues surrounding sustainability and environmental protection and consisted of various presentations, food stalls, challenges, games, raffles which was both entertaining and educational.

Several external organizations took part and there were several booths aimed at supporting “up cycling” or improving and reusing unneeded things.

Students were requested to bring unneeded, light colored t-shirts (for tie-dyeing), broken electronics, empty batteries and plastic water bottles. The bottles entitled the students to raffle tickets, the winners receiving prizes.

The event opened with a welcome speech from Dr. Ahmed Okasha who outlined the need for more environmental awareness especially the over use of plastics in our everyday lives.

This was followed by a presentation from Mr. Rashed Karkain who spoke about the history of and the rationale behind the Earth day project.

Dr. Alethea Wang, Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Communication, Arts and Sciences talked about endangered species and discussed hoe ways to prevent ecological damage.

Faculty and students attending then had the opportunity to visit the various stalls set up on the day.

One of the stalls to feature was Goumbook, who focus on the region’s efforts towards a greener economy. Their representative, Wissam Ali said that, “Based on the ethos of the Goum, a tribe of North African people who existed practicing an ethic of self-help and collective responsibility; sharing resources, reusing them when possible and avoiding any wastage; we aim to make all of us stand up for a green ideal and unite towards a better world where we share facts, ideas and advice on how to live a more responsible life. Anything we can do together for the environment is a good thing for this and future generations. We invite students to sign on as ambassadors and volunteers.”